Search

EconomistsTalkArt.org

Research-based policy analysis and commentary

Category

Cultural Economics

TRANSFORMATION AND JOB CREATION IN THE CULTURAL AND CREATIVE INDUSTRIES IN SOUTH AFRICA

By Jen Snowball, Alan Collins and Delon Tarentaal

The Cultural and Creative Industries (CCIs) have been hailed as offering great potential to create jobs and to be socially inclusive. This study investigates to what extent the CCIs in South Africa are moving towards more inclusive and racially diverse patterns in their ownership and employment profiles. Using a survey of 2400 randomly selected CCIs, it compares ownership and employment patterns across the six UNESCO Cultural Domains to determine their contribution to black economic empowerment (transformation) within the various domains.

Continue reading “TRANSFORMATION AND JOB CREATION IN THE CULTURAL AND CREATIVE INDUSTRIES IN SOUTH AFRICA”

Advertisements

EXPLAINING THE CONTROVERSIAL APPEAL OF MOVIE FRANCHISES

An Application of ‘Consumption Capital Theory’ to Serial Media Content

By Christian Opitz and Kay H. Hofmann

sequel movie eta

The appeal of movie continuations clearly is in the eye of the beholder. While loyal fans tend to praise them, the average cineaste is often skeptical of sequels and other serial media content. Nevertheless, leveraging proven storylines in the form of so-called ‘franchises’ has become an omnipresent phenomenon in Hollywood. We study the determinants of sequel success off the beaten track by applying ‘consumption capital theory’ to movie franchises. Our empirical results point to the explanatory power of the proposed framework and may help industry executives to improve the profitability of sequel projects. Continue reading “EXPLAINING THE CONTROVERSIAL APPEAL OF MOVIE FRANCHISES”

MAKING CULTURE CAPITAL: EVALUATING THREE DECADES OF THE EUROPEAN CAPITAL OF CULTURE

By Pedro Gomes and Alejandro Librero-Cano

We measure the regional impact of the European Capital of Culture programme using a difference-in-differences approach. GDP per capita in hosting regions is 4.5 % higher compared to non-hosting regions during the event, and the effect persists more than 5 years after it. This result suggests that the economic dimension of the event is important and supports claims that the event serves as catalyst for urban regeneration and development.

Continue reading “MAKING CULTURE CAPITAL: EVALUATING THREE DECADES OF THE EUROPEAN CAPITAL OF CULTURE”

FOR MUSEUMS, WITH RAIN COME CROWDS?

By Harold E. Cuffe

Weather is regarded as an important determinant of leisure choices, yet little attention has been paid to the ways that weather affects museum attendance. I find that rainfall generally increases attendance at a large national museum, on average. However, closer scrutiny of the data shows that weather can possess both encouraging and discouraging effects on attendance, depending upon the timing and persistence of the rain.

Continue reading “FOR MUSEUMS, WITH RAIN COME CROWDS?”

THE PRINCESS OF ASTURIAS FOUNDATION OR HOW A NON-PROFIT INSTITUTION CAN BE EFFICIENT

By Víctor Fernández-Blanco and Ana Rodríguez-Álvarez

Competition and the internal logic of markets induce cultural firms and institutions to be efficient when market oriented. But, what happens in the case of non-profit organizations? They are beyond the market and their internal logic does not guarantee economic efficiency. In our article we explore the technical and allocative efficiency of The Princess of Asturias Foundation and confirm its good performance over the years.

Continue reading “THE PRINCESS OF ASTURIAS FOUNDATION OR HOW A NON-PROFIT INSTITUTION CAN BE EFFICIENT”

CULTURALLY-BIASED VOTING IN THE EUROVISION SONG CONTEST: DO NATIONAL CONTESTS DIFFER?

By Julia Pannicke and Oliver Budzinski

Regarding the Eurovision Song Contest (ESC) there are numerous controversies about discriminating and tactical voting. People vote for their neighbor countries and for countries with cultural similarities instead of evaluating simply the musical performance. If these biases were caused by the diversity of the different countries, voting biases should be less important for a national music contest with substantially more homogenous contestants. The question arises of whether biased voting occurs as well. Do national contests differ regarding their voting behavior? Is biased voting maybe unavoidable?

Continue reading “CULTURALLY-BIASED VOTING IN THE EUROVISION SONG CONTEST: DO NATIONAL CONTESTS DIFFER?”

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: