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TWO INFORMATION AGGREGATION MECHANISMS FOR PREDICTING THE OPENING WEEKEND BOX OFFICE REVENUES OF FILMS

By David Court, Benjamin Gillen, Jordi McKenzie and Charles R. Plott

Many entertainment and, more generally, cultural products are characterised by significant levels of uncertainty regarding their ultimate appeal to consumers. This is perhaps no place better observed than in the theatrical film industry, where the famous ‘nobody knows anything’ quote of William Goldman has often been used to support this idea. We present two aggregation mechanisms to predict the opening weekend box office success of films and show they are able to provide useful predictions of box office revenues. Continue reading “TWO INFORMATION AGGREGATION MECHANISMS FOR PREDICTING THE OPENING WEEKEND BOX OFFICE REVENUES OF FILMS”

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ARE THEY ALL THE SAME? A CASE STUDY OF THREE AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS ARTISTS

By Lisa Farrell, Jane M. Fry and Tim R.L. Fry

Many studies of art auctions assume that a single statistical model using observed characteristics relating to the artwork and the auction can explain the observed variation in the sample of all artworks and artists. We show that such “pooling” is not always appropriate and may lead to erroneous conclusions.

Continue reading “ARE THEY ALL THE SAME? A CASE STUDY OF THREE AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS ARTISTS”

TRANSFORMATION AND JOB CREATION IN THE CULTURAL AND CREATIVE INDUSTRIES IN SOUTH AFRICA

By Jen Snowball, Alan Collins and Delon Tarentaal

The Cultural and Creative Industries (CCIs) have been hailed as offering great potential to create jobs and to be socially inclusive. This study investigates to what extent the CCIs in South Africa are moving towards more inclusive and racially diverse patterns in their ownership and employment profiles. Using a survey of 2400 randomly selected CCIs, it compares ownership and employment patterns across the six UNESCO Cultural Domains to determine their contribution to black economic empowerment (transformation) within the various domains.

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THE ROLE PLAYED BY CULTURAL HERITAGE IN INFLUENCING THE LOCATION CHOICES OF SKILLED INDIVIDUALS

By Pia Nilsson and Mikaela Backman

The development of regions is determined by the knowledge and skills of people living there. Thus, it is in the interest of local policy makers to find location-specific attractors. New research shows that cultural heritage is one of these attractions.

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MAKING CULTURE CAPITAL: EVALUATING THREE DECADES OF THE EUROPEAN CAPITAL OF CULTURE

By Pedro Gomes and Alejandro Librero-Cano

We measure the regional impact of the European Capital of Culture programme using a difference-in-differences approach. GDP per capita in hosting regions is 4.5 % higher compared to non-hosting regions during the event, and the effect persists more than 5 years after it. This result suggests that the economic dimension of the event is important and supports claims that the event serves as catalyst for urban regeneration and development.

Continue reading “MAKING CULTURE CAPITAL: EVALUATING THREE DECADES OF THE EUROPEAN CAPITAL OF CULTURE”

DONOR GOVERNANCE AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT IN PROMINENT US ART MUSEUMS

By David Yermack

In the article, we study “donor governance”, which occurs when contributors to nonprofit firms place restrictions on their gifts to limit the discretion of managers. In a study of US art museums, we find that when donor restrictions are strong, museums shift their cost structures away from administration and toward program services. Restricted donations also appear to stabilize nonprofits, but reduce management flexibility.

Continue reading “DONOR GOVERNANCE AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT IN PROMINENT US ART MUSEUMS”

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