MUSEUM FUNDING IN TIMES OF COVID-19 CRISIS

By Carmen Camarero, Maria José Garrido, and Eva Vicente

In the current health and economic crisis triggered by Covid-19, the future of museums is facing a major financial challenge, a challenge that has appeared when the echoes of the previous crisis are still ringing. Indeed, this crisis has reopened the debate over museum funding.

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DO ITALIAN MUSEUMS REALLY COMPETE IN SERVICES?

By Roberto Cellini, Tiziana Cuccia and Domenico Lisi

Museums have experienced great changes over the past years. The weight attributed to traditional functions (collection, conservation, research and exhibition), and the way in which these functions are perceived, have been changing. Complementary services have been gaining importance, contributing to enlarge the audience and to lead visitors into “edutainment” experiences. In Italy, we find significant spatial effects (i.e., influence from the neighbours) in the provision of complementary services by museums. However, their relevance is different for public and private museums, and across types of service. From these pieces of evidence, we can learn something about the nature of competition among museums in Italy.

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CULTURAL HERITAGE AND NATURAL DISASTERS: THE INSURANCE CHOICE OF THE ITALIAN CATHEDRALS

By Francesco De Masi and Donatella Porrini

Given the threat of natural disasters to Cultural Heritage, this paper aims to analyze the diffusion of insurance contracts among Italian Cathedrals. As effective countermeasure against catastrophes, this risk management strategy is evaluated with the aim to contribute to the scientific debate on finding out how to protect Cultural Heritage.

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“IN THE MOOD FOR TECHNOLOGY?”: DIGITAL AND CINEMA

By Pierre-Jean Benghozi

Digital companies have invested the film industry by imposing their economic models. Meanwhile, a less disruptive “Art and Science” model of innovation has also emerged, with balanced relations with the players in place. These new technical intermediaries in the cinema are empowering themselves around skills and innovation platforms affecting all segments of the industry.

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INVENTING CULINARY HERITAGE

By Sophie Marie Cappelen and Jesper Strandgaard Pedersen

How can you invent a novel cuisine and culinary heritage? The study explores how a group of organisational actors constructs and employs historical narratives to authenticate, legitimise and mobilise support for a new, local cuisine, claimed to be temporally anchored in an unspecified ancient past. Conducting an in-depth case study of a culinary movement based in Istanbul, Turkey, three forms of ambiguity are identified that enable the construction of a common culinary heritage.

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ARE INTERNSHIPS IN THE CULTURAL INDUSTRY (UN)FAIR? A STUDY OF THE DEMAND SIDE

By Ellen Loots and Rūta Skujiņa

Work in the cultural industry has been labelled ‘affective labour’: many workers experience a strong affective attachment to arts and culture, originating and resulting in feelings of wellbeing, connectedness and excitement (cf. Hardt and Negri 2000). Young aspirant workers find the industry a highly appealing work environment, despite increasing evidence of drawbacks of cultural work, including underemployment, low pay and health problems due to the flexibility and insecurity that come with working in the cultural industry. Being able to enter such a labour market often requires a set of unpaid work experiences, including internships. How (un)fair is that?

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