THE USE OF IRONIC HUMOR IN FESTIVAL BRANDING

By Kati Suomi and Mervi Luonila

Ironic humor can be a powerful technique for attracting attention in the field of arts. It can be influential as well, but using it is a tricky business. The risk of misunderstanding is real and may carry serious implications. However, the artful use of ironic humor can steer stakeholders to share and co-create the brand identity of arts productions, such as festivals. In our article Suomi, Luonila & Tähtinen (2020) “Ironic festival brand co-creation” we attempted to find out: “how can ironic humor be used with and by stakeholders to co-create brand identity?” Continue reading “THE USE OF IRONIC HUMOR IN FESTIVAL BRANDING”

EFFECTS OF COVID-19 IN BRAZILIAN CULTURAL ECONOMICS

By Ana Flávia Machado, Débora Freire, Rodrigo Cavalcante Michel, Gabriel Vaz de Melo, and Alice Demattos Guimarães

Benguele

The Covid-19 global pandemic has drastically changed routines in worldwide. Given the high capacity of this virus reproduction, the most effective measure is social isolation. In this context, certain economic activities which are based on consumption outside the home and shared with other individuals, i.e.: sessions in movie theatres, live performances (theatre, dance, concerts, etc.), visits to galleries and museums, are and will be significantly affected by the current pandemic. Therefore, our objective is to discuss the Brazilian cultural sector, projecting the impacts of the shutdown of cultural activities outside home in both the cultural sector and broadly in the economy. Continue reading “EFFECTS OF COVID-19 IN BRAZILIAN CULTURAL ECONOMICS”

POLICING ART CRIME

By Naomi Oosterman

In the cold winter’s night of 9 to 10 January 2005, criminals left a devastating scene at the Westfries Museum in Hoorn, the Netherlands. Glass doors were shattered, wooden panels were destroyed, and valuable porcelain was smashed into hundreds of pieces. Possibly more devastating was the additional theft of 70 pieces of silver and 24 paintings of important 17th century artists like Jan van Goyen, Jacob Waben, and Matthias Withoos with an estimated value between €250.000 and €1.3 million. A few years later, without violence but with similar devastating consequences, seven paintings belonging to the Triton Family Foundation were stolen from the Kunsthal in Rotterdam. Amongst these were works by Claude Monet, Pablo Picasso, and Lucian Freud. Estimated value: €18.1 million. The 2002 thefts of two unique Van Gogh paintings from the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam, finalizes the list. ‘Childishly easy’ is how the theft was described in the media. With a rope, ladder, and a broken window, the criminals could steal one of only two seascapes made by Van Gogh from his Dutch years. The described cases are considered to be the most notable art crimes that took place in the Netherlands in the past 20 years. Continue reading “POLICING ART CRIME”

FRENCH MUSEUMS AND CROWDFUNDING : EVOLUTIONS AND OUTCOMES

By Marie Ballarini

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In France, museums are mainly public and almost all depend on state subsidies (private museums included). Faced with the stagnation of the latter, or even their substantial decline, many museums are turning to new sources of income in an effort to self-finance. At the request of their guardianship, it is becoming more and more common for museums to have to include in their funding projects a more or less significant share of self-funding, whatever the tool or tools chosen. Continue reading “FRENCH MUSEUMS AND CROWDFUNDING : EVOLUTIONS AND OUTCOMES”

THE CHANGING SOCIAL ECONOMY OF ART, ARE THE ARTS BECOMING LESS EXCLUSIVE?

By Hans Abbing

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Respect for art is high, also among those who do not consume serious art, though subsidy cuts testify of a decreasing respect for the “serious arts”. In spite of cuts, the so-called “excellent art”, like the very costly performances of certain high-end opera companies, continues to receive much public support —support of which almost exclusively well-to-do people profit. The performances are sometimes innovative, but not more than most of the less costly performances.

Continue reading “THE CHANGING SOCIAL ECONOMY OF ART, ARE THE ARTS BECOMING LESS EXCLUSIVE?”

HITTING THE ‘TRIPLE J HOTTEST 100’: WHAT IT MEANS FOR ARTISTS

By Paul Crosby, Liam Lenten and Jordi McKenzie

Music Australia Social Media

This study examines how success in an online music poll affects artists’ social media followers. On average, being voted into this poll increases artists’ followers by approximately double that of the control group. Furthermore, this increase is positively related to poll rank and less-established artists benefit relatively more from this success. Continue reading “HITTING THE ‘TRIPLE J HOTTEST 100’: WHAT IT MEANS FOR ARTISTS”

CAN WE MEASURE CULTURE IN CITIES?

By Valentina Montalto

Provided that culture uniquely defines a city, which urban contexts are more culturally vibrant? And in which ones does culture drive creative economies? This study presents a novel and freely accessible dataset – the Cultural and Creative Cities Monitor – gathering 29 indicators for 168 European cities. Capitals generally lead on ‘Creative Economy’ but non-capitals do better on ‘Cultural Vibrancy’.

Continue reading “CAN WE MEASURE CULTURE IN CITIES?”

CREATIVITY AND THE CITY: TESTING THE ATTENUATION OF AGGLOMERATION ECONOMIES FOR THE CREATIVE INDUSTRIES

By Eva Coll-Martinez

Creative service industries (CSI)’s agglomeration rapidly decays with distance. This fact suggests that for CSI higher expected returns in terms of productivity arise from being agglomerated at the city centre. However, previous studies have not discussed how market potential effects could mitigate the agglomeration advantages for CSI. In this regard, I estimate the effects of having more near CSI firms on productivity in Barcelona controlling for specific neighbouring characteristics as demand factors and cultural amenities.

Continue reading “CREATIVITY AND THE CITY: TESTING THE ATTENUATION OF AGGLOMERATION ECONOMIES FOR THE CREATIVE INDUSTRIES”

CULTURAL DIVERSITY OF THE FILM INDUSTRY IN THE EU

By Georgios Alaveras, Estrella Gomez-Herrera and Bertin Martens

This paper explores new data sources on multilateral trade in films among EU countries and with the USA in offline cinema and in online video-on-demand distribution. We observe variations in trade patterns across countries and films and explore how they affect cultural diversity.

Continue reading “CULTURAL DIVERSITY OF THE FILM INDUSTRY IN THE EU”

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