CULTURAL COMMONS AND URBAN DYNAMICS: A MULTIDISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVE

By Emanuela Macrì, Valeria Morea and Michele Trimarchi

The recent urban experience reveals the growing importance of commons as a complex and often conflictual phenomenon where shared cultural practices are being developed within a responsible management of urban areas. In such intensive dynamics, the conventional binary between private and public interests leaves an undefined space for collective views and actions, whose definition and analysis calls for a multidisciplinary approach: economic, legal, sociological, architectural toolboxes need to establish a multifold dialogue, in order for interpretations of cultural commons and urban dynamics to generate consistent guidelines for urban policy and governance.

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MUSEUM FUNDING IN TIMES OF COVID-19 CRISIS

By Carmen Camarero, Maria José Garrido, and Eva Vicente

In the current health and economic crisis triggered by Covid-19, the future of museums is facing a major financial challenge, a challenge that has appeared when the echoes of the previous crisis are still ringing. Indeed, this crisis has reopened the debate over museum funding.

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DO ITALIAN MUSEUMS REALLY COMPETE IN SERVICES?

By Roberto Cellini, Tiziana Cuccia and Domenico Lisi

Museums have experienced great changes over the past years. The weight attributed to traditional functions (collection, conservation, research and exhibition), and the way in which these functions are perceived, have been changing. Complementary services have been gaining importance, contributing to enlarge the audience and to lead visitors into “edutainment” experiences. In Italy, we find significant spatial effects (i.e., influence from the neighbours) in the provision of complementary services by museums. However, their relevance is different for public and private museums, and across types of service. From these pieces of evidence, we can learn something about the nature of competition among museums in Italy.

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REPORT FROM BROOKLYN ON THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF ART DURING CORONAVIRUS TIME

By Cameron Weber

In Weber (2017), I introduce the category “art statism” to describe when the state, as defined by Max Weber (1919), uses public art to gain, maintain or grow its discretionary power. In this blog I share a personal story taking place during coronavirus-time in New York City, centered around the Brooklyn Museum and this highly-divisive time in American politics, to illustrate an on-the-ground example of art-statism.

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TESTING THE CULTURAL CAPITAL REPRODUCTION THEORY IN COLOMBIA

By Nora Elena Espinal-Monsalve, Andrey David Ramos-Ramírez y Luz Yadira Gómez-Hernández

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The relationship between cultural reproduction and cultural consumption can be framed from the theory of social reproduction of Bourdieu (1986) to the theories of cultural omnivorousness (Peterson, Simkus, and Kern, 1996) and individualization (Bauman (2007). Greater participation in cultural activities generates employment, economic growth, and increases the perception of the quality of life. As such, understanding the extent to which it is an inherited behaviour from parents, is a fundamental policy issue to reduce participation gaps among different demographics. Continue reading “TESTING THE CULTURAL CAPITAL REPRODUCTION THEORY IN COLOMBIA”

DOES MUSIC SOOTHE THE SOUL?

By Jonathan Daniel Gómez‐Zapata, Luis César Herrero‐Prieto, and Beatriz Rodríguez‐Prado

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Music is linked to human senses and emotions and is one of the most important manifestations of mankind’s creativity as well as being a factor that forges individual identity and realisation. Music also has implications in an area’s social, cultural and economic configuration, such that it helps to define collective and geographical cultural idiosyncrasy, and may also help to shape long-term economic development. Music can act as a powerful tool for progress and social change since it is particularly suited to dealing with risk factors amongst the young, such as helping to reduce crime levels, fostering peace amongst communities and improving individuals’ socioemotional health and quality of life. Continue reading “DOES MUSIC SOOTHE THE SOUL?”

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