FISCAL AND ECONOMIC ASPECTS OF BOOK CONSUMPTION IN THE EUROPEAN UNION

By Karol Jan Borowiecki and Trilce Navarrete

One of the available and yet controversial tools in cultural policy at the national level is the reduction of VAT rates for cultural goods and services. We document the standard and reduced VAT rates in EU-28 countries in the period from 1993 to 2013 and explore the underlying determinants. We also show and estimate the exact positive effect of a fiscal rate reduction on the book expenditure.

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PUBLIC DIPLOMACY AND RACIAL JUSTICE: A MATCH MADE IN THE ARTS

By Pier-Luc Dupont

While many institutions have recognised the arts’ potential contribution to intercultural dialogue, voter ethnocentrism or plain racism often make it arduous for policymakers to support foreign-origin artists and keep their own jobs. But what emerges when a social justice measure is brushed over in diplomatic hues? A surprising breakthrough may be the short answer. Continue reading “PUBLIC DIPLOMACY AND RACIAL JUSTICE: A MATCH MADE IN THE ARTS”

CHANGING FUNDERS, CHANGING VALUES? EVIDENCE ON CROWDFUNDING IN THE NETHERLANDS

By Quirijn L. van den Hoogen

 

What happens to art worlds when funding mechanisms change? The Dutch case is of particular interest as the national government cut around 25% of the national cultural budget in 2013. This was legitimized by arguing that the cultural sector was ‘over-reliant on public funding’, pointing to crowdfunding as an alternative to state funding. But, what happens when the government relies on ‘the wisdom of the crowd’ rather than decisions of experts from the cultural sector?

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UNFORESEEN CONSEQUENCES OF GOVERNMENT BUDGET CUTS TO PUBLIC LIBRARIES

By Amir Borges Ferreira Neto

Recent pressure to reduce public budgets have been affecting public libraries all across the US. Such government budget cuts make other components of a library’s revenue, namely, donations from private individuals and grants, relatively more important. In our study, we show that every dollar spent by local, state and federal governments is correlated with a significant increase in donations. Therefore, policy-makers should be cautious when cutting funds from public entities, especially from cultural-type entities such as public libraries. Continue reading “UNFORESEEN CONSEQUENCES OF GOVERNMENT BUDGET CUTS TO PUBLIC LIBRARIES”

CULTURAL DIPLOMACY: ARM’S LENGTH STRATEGIES UNDER THE MICROSCOPE

By Kalliopi Fouseki and Dimitra Kizlari

Cultural diplomacy has been steadily gaining momentum the past decade in EU policy-making circles. Despite genuine efforts to build a common strategy, the member-states still have a long way as their individual differences in managing cultural relations present striking variance.

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DOES THE LONG-TAIL BENEFIT SMALL PUBLISHERS? EVIDENCE FROM THE FRENCH PUBLISHING INDUSTRY

By Stéphanie Peltier, Françoise Benhamou and Mamoudou Toure

Long tail

What does the long tail effect mean? In many industries, sales are concentrated on a few products in spite of the diversity of products available. The long-tail effect weakens the high level of concentration of sales. It compensates for a “winner-take-all” or a superstar phenomenon. But is there also a long-tail for small publishers?

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