DOES MUSIC SOOTHE THE SOUL?

By Jonathan Daniel Gómez‐Zapata, Luis César Herrero‐Prieto, and Beatriz Rodríguez‐Prado

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Music is linked to human senses and emotions and is one of the most important manifestations of mankind’s creativity as well as being a factor that forges individual identity and realisation. Music also has implications in an area’s social, cultural and economic configuration, such that it helps to define collective and geographical cultural idiosyncrasy, and may also help to shape long-term economic development. Music can act as a powerful tool for progress and social change since it is particularly suited to dealing with risk factors amongst the young, such as helping to reduce crime levels, fostering peace amongst communities and improving individuals’ socioemotional health and quality of life. Continue reading “DOES MUSIC SOOTHE THE SOUL?”

THE USE OF IRONIC HUMOR IN FESTIVAL BRANDING

By Kati Suomi and Mervi Luonila

Ironic humor can be a powerful technique for attracting attention in the field of arts. It can be influential as well, but using it is a tricky business. The risk of misunderstanding is real and may carry serious implications. However, the artful use of ironic humor can steer stakeholders to share and co-create the brand identity of arts productions, such as festivals. In our article Suomi, Luonila & Tähtinen (2020) “Ironic festival brand co-creation” we attempted to find out: “how can ironic humor be used with and by stakeholders to co-create brand identity?” Continue reading “THE USE OF IRONIC HUMOR IN FESTIVAL BRANDING”

DATA-DRIVEN CULTURE, ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND MACHINE CREATIVITY

By Christian Peukert

Digitization has made a large impact on the cultural industries in the past 20 years. With a new wave of technologies arriving, it will be important to understand the economic implications of data and artificial intelligence that complements, or perhaps substitutes for human creativity with regards to cultural participation, copyright and the industrial organization of culture.

Continue reading “DATA-DRIVEN CULTURE, ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND MACHINE CREATIVITY”

RELIGION AND CULTURAL PARTICIPATION: WHAT THE EVIDENCE SHOWS

By Juan D. Montoro-Pons and Manuel Cuadrado-García

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Is there any link between religiousness and participation in the arts? This work identifies two dimensions of religiousness and estimates the impact these have on highbrow and lowbrow cultural participation. Evidence supports religiosity both as a means of building social relations (increasing participation in the arts) and of self-expression and attachment to a set of norms (decreasing arts consumption). Continue reading “RELIGION AND CULTURAL PARTICIPATION: WHAT THE EVIDENCE SHOWS”

USING EXPERIMENTS TO ADDRESS PARTICIPATORY MANAGEMENT OF CULTURAL HERITAGE

By Mina Dragouni and Nikos Georgantzis

Despite the increasing popularity of community-inclusive, bottom-up management in the field of cultural heritage, researchers on the subject still face the challenge of limited naturally-occurring data of participatory processes. This hinders the systematic study on the subject, which would be necessary for informing implementation to the real world. Is there any other way to gather relevant data and escape from this vicious circle? Well, we’d better start experimenting! Literally.

Continue reading “USING EXPERIMENTS TO ADDRESS PARTICIPATORY MANAGEMENT OF CULTURAL HERITAGE”

DOUBLE JEOPARDY – MORE FLEXIBLE SUBSCRIPTION TICKETS AND HIGHER TICKET PRICES

By Jeffrey Pompe, Lawrence Tamburri and Johnathan Munn

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Symphony orchestras have increasingly relied on flexible ticket subscriptions and higher ticket prices for revenue generation. We found that relying on flexible ticket subscriptions may decrease total ticket sales. We discuss how more flexible subscription sales combined with higher ticket prices can have deleterious effects on symphony orchestra finances.

Continue reading “DOUBLE JEOPARDY – MORE FLEXIBLE SUBSCRIPTION TICKETS AND HIGHER TICKET PRICES”

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