USING EXPERIMENTS TO ADDRESS PARTICIPATORY MANAGEMENT OF CULTURAL HERITAGE

By Mina Dragouni and Nikos Georgantzis

Despite the increasing popularity of community-inclusive, bottom-up management in the field of cultural heritage, researchers on the subject still face the challenge of limited naturally-occurring data of participatory processes. This hinders the systematic study on the subject, which would be necessary for informing implementation to the real world. Is there any other way to gather relevant data and escape from this vicious circle? Well, we’d better start experimenting! Literally.

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DOUBLE JEOPARDY – MORE FLEXIBLE SUBSCRIPTION TICKETS AND HIGHER TICKET PRICES

By Jeffrey Pompe, Lawrence Tamburri and Johnathan Munn

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Symphony orchestras have increasingly relied on flexible ticket subscriptions and higher ticket prices for revenue generation. We found that relying on flexible ticket subscriptions may decrease total ticket sales. We discuss how more flexible subscription sales combined with higher ticket prices can have deleterious effects on symphony orchestra finances.

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EXPLAINING THE CONTROVERSIAL APPEAL OF MOVIE FRANCHISES

An Application of ‘Consumption Capital Theory’ to Serial Media Content

By Christian Opitz and Kay H. Hofmann

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The appeal of movie continuations clearly is in the eye of the beholder. While loyal fans tend to praise them, the average cineaste is often skeptical of sequels and other serial media content. Nevertheless, leveraging proven storylines in the form of so-called ‘franchises’ has become an omnipresent phenomenon in Hollywood. We study the determinants of sequel success off the beaten track by applying ‘consumption capital theory’ to movie franchises. Our empirical results point to the explanatory power of the proposed framework and may help industry executives to improve the profitability of sequel projects. Continue reading “EXPLAINING THE CONTROVERSIAL APPEAL OF MOVIE FRANCHISES”

FAIRNESS CONSIDERATIONS IN THE LIVE MUSIC INDUSTRY

By Hendrik Sonnabend

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Traditional economic thinking presumes artists in the live music business to act like a monopolist who adjusts the ticket price to variations in demand whenever it is possible. This contribution provides strong evidence indicating that they do not. I argue that this behavior can best be explained with fairness expectations on the part of concert attendees. Continue reading “FAIRNESS CONSIDERATIONS IN THE LIVE MUSIC INDUSTRY”

VOLATILE ART AUDIENCES

By Koen van Eijck

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Cultural consumers are increasingly hard to pin down as a certain type of consumer with a clearly defined taste. In addition, younger generations show a declining interest in canonized art forms. At the same time, government support for the arts is being reduced in many countries, including the Netherlands, and consumers too have less to spend on art. What are the consequences of this situation for cultural policy makers, producers and venues? Continue reading “VOLATILE ART AUDIENCES”

INSPIRING LOUVRE OR TATE? SUBJECTIVE WELL-BEING AND ENGAGEMENT IN ARTS, CULTURE AND SPORT

By Daniel Wheatley and Craig Bickerton

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Does engagement in art, culture and sport have positive effects on our well-being? This research contributes to our understanding of the positive leisure experience, and cultural value, derived from engagement in arts, cultural and sporting activities. Findings indicate that the use or ‘quality’ of leisure time, rather than simply quantity, has relevance in deriving positive experiences, and is indicative of activities which exhibit a number of ‘cultural characteristics’ delivering benefits even when engaged with less frequently.

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