HITTING THE ‘TRIPLE J HOTTEST 100’: WHAT IT MEANS FOR ARTISTS

By Paul Crosby, Liam Lenten and Jordi McKenzie

Music Australia Social Media

This study examines how success in an online music poll affects artists’ social media followers. On average, being voted into this poll increases artists’ followers by approximately double that of the control group. Furthermore, this increase is positively related to poll rank and less-established artists benefit relatively more from this success. Continue reading “HITTING THE ‘TRIPLE J HOTTEST 100’: WHAT IT MEANS FOR ARTISTS”

MEASURING EMOTION THROUGH QUALITY IN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRAS

By Mafalda Gómez-Vega and Luis César Herrero-Prieto

Repertoire programming decisions taken by symphony orchestras usually pursue a mixture of aims that embrace both quality and audience success. We also assume there is a link between fineness or brilliance and excitement. Based on these premises, we assess the quality of symphony orchestras by evaluating their musical repertoire using three partial indicators: contemporaneity, most well-known composers, and repertoire originality.

Continue reading “MEASURING EMOTION THROUGH QUALITY IN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRAS”

DOUBLE JEOPARDY – MORE FLEXIBLE SUBSCRIPTION TICKETS AND HIGHER TICKET PRICES

By Jeffrey Pompe, Lawrence Tamburri and Johnathan Munn

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Symphony orchestras have increasingly relied on flexible ticket subscriptions and higher ticket prices for revenue generation. We found that relying on flexible ticket subscriptions may decrease total ticket sales. We discuss how more flexible subscription sales combined with higher ticket prices can have deleterious effects on symphony orchestra finances.

Continue reading “DOUBLE JEOPARDY – MORE FLEXIBLE SUBSCRIPTION TICKETS AND HIGHER TICKET PRICES”

FAIRNESS CONSIDERATIONS IN THE LIVE MUSIC INDUSTRY

By Hendrik Sonnabend

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Traditional economic thinking presumes artists in the live music business to act like a monopolist who adjusts the ticket price to variations in demand whenever it is possible. This contribution provides strong evidence indicating that they do not. I argue that this behavior can best be explained with fairness expectations on the part of concert attendees. Continue reading “FAIRNESS CONSIDERATIONS IN THE LIVE MUSIC INDUSTRY”

MUSIC AND THE MUSIC INDUSTRY: A SAD-ONOMICS APPROACH

Samuel Cameron

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The economic analysis of music is at a crossroad. Digital innovations undermine the concepts of production deeply embedded in economics textbooks. Do we need a new production function? Can this be the SAD (serendipity, authenticity and drugs) production function extended to allow for the creation of value in the consumers’ subjective perceptions?

Continue reading “MUSIC AND THE MUSIC INDUSTRY: A SAD-ONOMICS APPROACH”

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