THE USE OF IRONIC HUMOR IN FESTIVAL BRANDING

By Kati Suomi and Mervi Luonila

Ironic humor can be a powerful technique for attracting attention in the field of arts. It can be influential as well, but using it is a tricky business. The risk of misunderstanding is real and may carry serious implications. However, the artful use of ironic humor can steer stakeholders to share and co-create the brand identity of arts productions, such as festivals. In our article Suomi, Luonila & Tähtinen (2020) “Ironic festival brand co-creation” we attempted to find out: “how can ironic humor be used with and by stakeholders to co-create brand identity?” Continue reading “THE USE OF IRONIC HUMOR IN FESTIVAL BRANDING”

EFFECTS OF COVID-19 IN BRAZILIAN CULTURAL ECONOMICS

By Ana Flávia Machado, Débora Freire, Rodrigo Cavalcante Michel, Gabriel Vaz de Melo, and Alice Demattos Guimarães

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The Covid-19 global pandemic has drastically changed routines in worldwide. Given the high capacity of this virus reproduction, the most effective measure is social isolation. In this context, certain economic activities which are based on consumption outside the home and shared with other individuals, i.e.: sessions in movie theatres, live performances (theatre, dance, concerts, etc.), visits to galleries and museums, are and will be significantly affected by the current pandemic. Therefore, our objective is to discuss the Brazilian cultural sector, projecting the impacts of the shutdown of cultural activities outside home in both the cultural sector and broadly in the economy. Continue reading “EFFECTS OF COVID-19 IN BRAZILIAN CULTURAL ECONOMICS”

POLICING ART CRIME

By Naomi Oosterman

In the cold winter’s night of 9 to 10 January 2005, criminals left a devastating scene at the Westfries Museum in Hoorn, the Netherlands. Glass doors were shattered, wooden panels were destroyed, and valuable porcelain was smashed into hundreds of pieces. Possibly more devastating was the additional theft of 70 pieces of silver and 24 paintings of important 17th century artists like Jan van Goyen, Jacob Waben, and Matthias Withoos with an estimated value between €250.000 and €1.3 million. A few years later, without violence but with similar devastating consequences, seven paintings belonging to the Triton Family Foundation were stolen from the Kunsthal in Rotterdam. Amongst these were works by Claude Monet, Pablo Picasso, and Lucian Freud. Estimated value: €18.1 million. The 2002 thefts of two unique Van Gogh paintings from the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam, finalizes the list. ‘Childishly easy’ is how the theft was described in the media. With a rope, ladder, and a broken window, the criminals could steal one of only two seascapes made by Van Gogh from his Dutch years. The described cases are considered to be the most notable art crimes that took place in the Netherlands in the past 20 years. Continue reading “POLICING ART CRIME”

FRENCH MUSEUMS AND CROWDFUNDING : EVOLUTIONS AND OUTCOMES

By Marie Ballarini

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In France, museums are mainly public and almost all depend on state subsidies (private museums included). Faced with the stagnation of the latter, or even their substantial decline, many museums are turning to new sources of income in an effort to self-finance. At the request of their guardianship, it is becoming more and more common for museums to have to include in their funding projects a more or less significant share of self-funding, whatever the tool or tools chosen. Continue reading “FRENCH MUSEUMS AND CROWDFUNDING : EVOLUTIONS AND OUTCOMES”

UNDERSTANDING INSTITUTIONAL LOGICS AND INSTITUTIONAL WORK PRACTICES IN FESTIVALS: LUCCA COMICS AND GAMES

By Yesim Tonga Uriarte, Robert DeFillippi, Massimo Riccaboni, Maria Luisa Catoni

How are festivals managed within their wide net of temporal, social and institutional relations? In search of answers, we provide the summary of a case study that features one of the biggest comic-cons in the world and we argue that understanding how festivals maintain themselves must focus on understanding how these temporary organizations are able to effect processes of persistence, stability and change in the context of upheaval, continuity and transformation. Continue reading “UNDERSTANDING INSTITUTIONAL LOGICS AND INSTITUTIONAL WORK PRACTICES IN FESTIVALS: LUCCA COMICS AND GAMES”

LEVERAGING ANALYTICS TO PRODUCE COMPELLING AND PROFITABLE FILM CONTENT

By Ronny Behrens, Natasha Zhang Foutz, Michael Franklin, Jannis Funk, Fernanda Gutierrez-Navratil, Julian Hofmann and Ulrike Leibfried

In light of the rising availability of big data and the fast evolution and diffusion of analytical methods in the creative industries, content producers are faced with manifold opportunities, but also feel the pressure to leverage those resources to create more compelling and profitable content. Dissecting state-of-the-art research as well as current industry developments and embedding them in theories of value creation and film production, we identified key analytic techniques that producers can utilize to their benefit at various stages of film production.

Continue reading “LEVERAGING ANALYTICS TO PRODUCE COMPELLING AND PROFITABLE FILM CONTENT”

THE “PARSIMONIOUS” CONDUCTOR? HOW ORCHESTRAS’ DISCIPLINE PREVENTS CONDUCTORS TO OVER-LEAD

By Emmanuel Coblence, Cyrille Sardais and Josée Lortie

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What do orchestra conductors actually do? How can arts leadership articulate both “discipline” and “creativity”? Through the use of ethnographic data and interviews, this study suggests that the orchestra conductor’s leadership relies on disciplinary devices to gain strength and freedom, while avoiding the trap of “over-leading”. Continue reading “THE “PARSIMONIOUS” CONDUCTOR? HOW ORCHESTRAS’ DISCIPLINE PREVENTS CONDUCTORS TO OVER-LEAD”

THE ROLE OF ART INVESTMENT AS A HEDGE OR SAFE HAVEN

By Belma Öztürkkal and Asli Togan-Egrican

Can art can be considered a safe haven during volatile times or a hedging option in general? we analyze long-term art auction sales data focusing on and around financial crisis periods in a volatile emerging market. Our findings suggest Turkish art returns are either negatively correlated or at low correlation with other investments, including the equity market.

Continue reading “THE ROLE OF ART INVESTMENT AS A HEDGE OR SAFE HAVEN”

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