SIEC 2019: THE HAPPY FEW, ALBEIT FURTHER AND FURTHER AWAY

By Luis César Herrero-Prieto

Foto imagen Valdivia_Jonathan Gómez

Those of us who practise and study in the field of cultural economics often find ourselves being called ‘the happy few’. It is true that there are few of us who are followers if we compare ourselves in number to those in other areas of, let us say, mainstream knowledge in economics, although one does sometimes get the feeling that we make up one tight-knit group with our regular meetings, and it is indeed astonishing to see the enthusiasm of those who form part of this community. Nowhere else can you find scholars who believe so passionately in what they are contributing and in what they are unearthing, probably because what they discover and what they study are linked to feelings and deep-rooted perceptions of human nature such as emotion, beauty or identity. Continue reading “SIEC 2019: THE HAPPY FEW, ALBEIT FURTHER AND FURTHER AWAY”

EX-ANTE VS. EX-POST: A REASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC IMPACT STUDIES IN ARTS AND CULTURE

By Andrej Srakar and Marilena Vecco

The estimation of the economic effects of cultural events is a topic that has stirred numerous debates in cultural economics. Although economic impact studies and contingent valuation have been the most frequently used methods, both suffer from numerous problems. In this article, we use ex-post econometric verification as a new and promising method in cultural economics in the estimation of the economic effects of cultural events and apply it to the estimation of the effects of the 2012 European Capital of Culture Maribor on tourism and employment.

Continue reading “EX-ANTE VS. EX-POST: A REASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC IMPACT STUDIES IN ARTS AND CULTURE”

MAKING CULTURE CAPITAL: EVALUATING THREE DECADES OF THE EUROPEAN CAPITAL OF CULTURE

By Pedro Gomes and Alejandro Librero-Cano

We measure the regional impact of the European Capital of Culture programme using a difference-in-differences approach. GDP per capita in hosting regions is 4.5 % higher compared to non-hosting regions during the event, and the effect persists more than 5 years after it. This result suggests that the economic dimension of the event is important and supports claims that the event serves as catalyst for urban regeneration and development.

Continue reading “MAKING CULTURE CAPITAL: EVALUATING THREE DECADES OF THE EUROPEAN CAPITAL OF CULTURE”

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