MUSEUM FUNDING IN TIMES OF COVID-19 CRISIS

By Carmen Camarero, Maria José Garrido, and Eva Vicente

In the current health and economic crisis triggered by Covid-19, the future of museums is facing a major financial challenge, a challenge that has appeared when the echoes of the previous crisis are still ringing. Indeed, this crisis has reopened the debate over museum funding.

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DO ITALIAN MUSEUMS REALLY COMPETE IN SERVICES?

By Roberto Cellini, Tiziana Cuccia and Domenico Lisi

Museums have experienced great changes over the past years. The weight attributed to traditional functions (collection, conservation, research and exhibition), and the way in which these functions are perceived, have been changing. Complementary services have been gaining importance, contributing to enlarge the audience and to lead visitors into “edutainment” experiences. In Italy, we find significant spatial effects (i.e., influence from the neighbours) in the provision of complementary services by museums. However, their relevance is different for public and private museums, and across types of service. From these pieces of evidence, we can learn something about the nature of competition among museums in Italy.

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EconomistsTalkArt.org wishes you happy holidays and a great new year 2021!

By The Editorial Team

The Editorial Team of EconomistsTalkArt.org wishes you a happy start into the New Year!

The blog started as an idea among four young scholars in 2015. In November, the blog has been celebrating its fifth birthday and ends the year with yet another set of record numbers: 9400+ recurring visitors, 16700+ views in 2020, 25 articles per year.

The blog continues to be one of central dissemination tools of the work of cultural economists around the world.

In this year, members of the blog editorial have also been at the forefront in the forming of CEOS – Cultural Economics Online Seminar, starting in January 2021.

This year, 2021, also brings the main regular cultural economic event, 21st ACEI Conference in Lille from 6-9 July, 2021.

We sincerely hope the New Year will continue providing you with the pleasure of reading posts written by leading authors in cultural economics.

With best wishes,

Editorial Team: Cedric, Christiane, Trilce, Elisa, Andrej and Marie.

CULTURAL HERITAGE AND NATURAL DISASTERS: THE INSURANCE CHOICE OF THE ITALIAN CATHEDRALS

By Francesco De Masi and Donatella Porrini

Given the threat of natural disasters to Cultural Heritage, this paper aims to analyze the diffusion of insurance contracts among Italian Cathedrals. As effective countermeasure against catastrophes, this risk management strategy is evaluated with the aim to contribute to the scientific debate on finding out how to protect Cultural Heritage.

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REPORT FROM BROOKLYN ON THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF ART DURING CORONAVIRUS TIME

By Cameron Weber

In Weber (2017), I introduce the category “art statism” to describe when the state, as defined by Max Weber (1919), uses public art to gain, maintain or grow its discretionary power. In this blog I share a personal story taking place during coronavirus-time in New York City, centered around the Brooklyn Museum and this highly-divisive time in American politics, to illustrate an on-the-ground example of art-statism.

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TOOLS FOR THE FUTURE IN LJUBLJANA, RESEARCHING ART MARKETS AND GLOBAL SCIENTIFIC “ONLINE” TURMOIL

By Andrej Srakar

Beginning of September was time for the fifth workshop in the series Tools for the Future: Researching Art Market Practices from Past to Present. The workshop took place online in organization of the France Stele Institute of Art History of the Research Centre of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts (ZRC SAZU). Its topic was the role of legislation and legal regulators in the art market and included some of the best researchers on art markets at the intersection of art history, legal studies and cultural economics.

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