IMPERIALIST FANTASIES AND POPULAR CULTURE: THE CASE OF TURKISH TV SOAPS

By Dimitra Laurence Larochelle

The worldwide success of Turkish soap operas has prompted many scholars to argue on the contribution of these cultural products to the county’s soft power abroad. Based on the data gathered during my survey on the reception of Turkish soap operas by Greeks, I examine the limits of the notion of soft power.

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AI CANNOT FEEL EMOTIONS BUT IT COMPOSES GREAT MUSIC

By Francisco Tigre Moura

The great Italian sculptor Michelangelo has allegedly once said, “Every block of stone has a statue inside, and it is the task of the sculptor to discover it.” We have always believed that only humans held the incredible skill of imagining and creating art, as if it represented a form of self-expression unique to our own specie. However, this perspective has changed. 

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BRACE YOURSELVES, PIRATES ARE COMING! THE EFFECTS OF GAME OF THRONES LEAK ON TV VIEWERSHIP

By Wojciech Hardy

On 11 April 2015, episodes of the hit show Game of Thrones were leaked to the web. The leak constituted a rare event whereas a massively popular and highly anticipated title became available through piracy prior to its official release. This temporary incentive to pirate seems to have harmed the TV viewership of the leaked show but also of other shows sharing their audience with Game of Thrones.

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“IN THE MOOD FOR TECHNOLOGY?”: DIGITAL AND CINEMA

By Pierre-Jean Benghozi

Digital companies have invested the film industry by imposing their economic models. Meanwhile, a less disruptive “Art and Science” model of innovation has also emerged, with balanced relations with the players in place. These new technical intermediaries in the cinema are empowering themselves around skills and innovation platforms affecting all segments of the industry.

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ARE INTERNSHIPS IN THE CULTURAL INDUSTRY (UN)FAIR? A STUDY OF THE DEMAND SIDE

By Ellen Loots and Rūta Skujiņa

Work in the cultural industry has been labelled ‘affective labour’: many workers experience a strong affective attachment to arts and culture, originating and resulting in feelings of wellbeing, connectedness and excitement (cf. Hardt and Negri 2000). Young aspirant workers find the industry a highly appealing work environment, despite increasing evidence of drawbacks of cultural work, including underemployment, low pay and health problems due to the flexibility and insecurity that come with working in the cultural industry. Being able to enter such a labour market often requires a set of unpaid work experiences, including internships. How (un)fair is that?

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WHAT EDITORS TALK ABOUT WHEN THEY TALK ABOUT EDITORS? AN ANALYSIS OF PUBLIC INTERVIEWS SEARCHING FOR MARKET AND AESTHETIC LOGICS

By Luca Pareschi and Maria Lusiani

The supposed conflict between aesthetic values and market logics has long been heating the debate among scholars in the cultural and creative industries: while over time researchers provided a more nuanced picture of the market-aesthetic logics tension, able to go beyond a prosaic conflict between the two extremes, some questions remain open. In this work we try to understand how editors in the publishing industry deal with market and aesthetic logics when they are interviewed regarding their work. Also, we address the organizational characteristics that may affect the editors’ discourses.

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