CULTURAL COMMONS AND URBAN DYNAMICS: A MULTIDISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVE

By Emanuela Macrì, Valeria Morea and Michele Trimarchi

The recent urban experience reveals the growing importance of commons as a complex and often conflictual phenomenon where shared cultural practices are being developed within a responsible management of urban areas. In such intensive dynamics, the conventional binary between private and public interests leaves an undefined space for collective views and actions, whose definition and analysis calls for a multidisciplinary approach: economic, legal, sociological, architectural toolboxes need to establish a multifold dialogue, in order for interpretations of cultural commons and urban dynamics to generate consistent guidelines for urban policy and governance.

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CULTURAL HERITAGE AND LOCAL DEVELOPMENT IN A TERRITORIAL CAPITAL CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK

By Roberto Camagni, Roberta Capello, Silvia Cerisola and Elisa Panzera

The role of Cultural Heritage in local development has been extensively recognized. In this respect, we suggest a conceptual framework that sees Cultural Heritage as one of the multiple elements of what is called “Territorial Capital”. According to our perspective, the effects of Cultural Heritage on local development stem from the interaction with the other components of Territorial Capital, in particular intangible territorial assets like creativity and identity.

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DO ITALIAN MUSEUMS REALLY COMPETE IN SERVICES?

By Roberto Cellini, Tiziana Cuccia and Domenico Lisi

Museums have experienced great changes over the past years. The weight attributed to traditional functions (collection, conservation, research and exhibition), and the way in which these functions are perceived, have been changing. Complementary services have been gaining importance, contributing to enlarge the audience and to lead visitors into “edutainment” experiences. In Italy, we find significant spatial effects (i.e., influence from the neighbours) in the provision of complementary services by museums. However, their relevance is different for public and private museums, and across types of service. From these pieces of evidence, we can learn something about the nature of competition among museums in Italy.

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CULTURAL HERITAGE AND NATURAL DISASTERS: THE INSURANCE CHOICE OF THE ITALIAN CATHEDRALS

By Francesco De Masi and Donatella Porrini

Given the threat of natural disasters to Cultural Heritage, this paper aims to analyze the diffusion of insurance contracts among Italian Cathedrals. As effective countermeasure against catastrophes, this risk management strategy is evaluated with the aim to contribute to the scientific debate on finding out how to protect Cultural Heritage.

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INVENTING CULINARY HERITAGE

By Sophie Marie Cappelen and Jesper Strandgaard Pedersen

How can you invent a novel cuisine and culinary heritage? The study explores how a group of organisational actors constructs and employs historical narratives to authenticate, legitimise and mobilise support for a new, local cuisine, claimed to be temporally anchored in an unspecified ancient past. Conducting an in-depth case study of a culinary movement based in Istanbul, Turkey, three forms of ambiguity are identified that enable the construction of a common culinary heritage.

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TESTING THE CULTURAL CAPITAL REPRODUCTION THEORY IN COLOMBIA

By Nora Elena Espinal-Monsalve, Andrey David Ramos-Ramírez y Luz Yadira Gómez-Hernández

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The relationship between cultural reproduction and cultural consumption can be framed from the theory of social reproduction of Bourdieu (1986) to the theories of cultural omnivorousness (Peterson, Simkus, and Kern, 1996) and individualization (Bauman (2007). Greater participation in cultural activities generates employment, economic growth, and increases the perception of the quality of life. As such, understanding the extent to which it is an inherited behaviour from parents, is a fundamental policy issue to reduce participation gaps among different demographics. Continue reading “TESTING THE CULTURAL CAPITAL REPRODUCTION THEORY IN COLOMBIA”

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