INTERNALIZING PRODUCTION COST AND CHANGES OF TASTES: MORE RECENT THEATRE PLAYS FEATURE FEWER ROLES

By Sacit Hadi Akdede, Victor Ginsburgh and Aynur Uçkaç 

We all know the big productions of older classical theatre have full imposing casts yet theatre productions are progressively losing cast size. Is this a response to changes in consumer taste or simply a way to lower the growing production costs?

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DOES COPYRIGHTS INCREASE CREATIVITY? LESSONS FROM ITALIAN OPERA DURING THE NAPOLEONIC AGE

By Michela Giorcelli and Petra Moser

Copyrights establish intellectual property rights in creative goods, from literature and science to images, film, and music. This work shows that the introduction of copyrights increases the quantity and the quality of creative output. Copyright extensions beyond the life of the original creator, however, have minimal effects on creativity.

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HOW TICKET PRICES TO SWEDISH OPERA HOUSES AND SYMPHONY ORCHESTRAS HAVE BECOME INCREASINGLY EXCLUSIVE

By Staffan Albinsson

Ambitions for social inclusion have guided the publicly funded opera houses and symphony orchestras since the early twentieth century. However, this explicit policy goal has not influenced ticket prices during the last four decades. The successive ticket price increases have resulted in a situation where only the better off attend the performances.

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BARGAINING OVER THE BALLET

By Caterina Mauri and Alexander Wolf

Women and men in couples enjoy shared leisure activities. When their preferences are not aligned, they implicitly (or explicitly) bargain over their arts consumption. The more influential a woman is within the couple, the more both partners consume high culture in a way that matches female singles’ preferences.

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MACHINE LEARNING TO UNCOVER DIFFERENCES IN WILLINGNESS-TO-PAY FOR THEATRE TICKETS

By Alina Ozhegova and Evgeniy M. Ozhegov

Estimation of willingness-to-pay (WTP) is widely spread approach in economics and marketing for problems of optimal pricing and measuring of product value for a customer. Machine learning approaches may help to estimate a range of WTP for theatre tickets and explain main sources of audience heterogeneity in estimates of WTP.

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DO THEATERS MAXIMIZE ATTENDANCE OR REVENUE?

By Andrea Baldin and Trine Bille

Most performing arts organizations are characterized by a complex array of objectives than merely the maximization of revenue.  In this paper, we introduce a multi-objective optimization model that jointly considers pricing and seat allocation. The proposed model is validated with booking data referring to the Royal Danish theater during the period 2010–2015.
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