BOLLYWOOD’S BATTLE

By Caroline Elliott and Sayantan Ghosh Dastidar

India has a longstanding reputation for its acclaimed film industry and continues to be by far the world’s largest producer of films. Nevertheless, domestic demand for films appears to be waning as in a number of developed countries with mature film industries. Results of the econometric analysis are used to demonstrate how the Indian film market can continue to have a significant positive impact on the Indian economy.

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MEASURING EMOTION THROUGH QUALITY IN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRAS

By Mafalda Gómez-Vega and Luis César Herrero-Prieto

Repertoire programming decisions taken by symphony orchestras usually pursue a mixture of aims that embrace both quality and audience success. We also assume there is a link between fineness or brilliance and excitement. Based on these premises, we assess the quality of symphony orchestras by evaluating their musical repertoire using three partial indicators: contemporaneity, most well-known composers, and repertoire originality.

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CULTURAL DIVERSITY OF THE FILM INDUSTRY IN THE EU

By Georgios Alaveras, Estrella Gomez-Herrera and Bertin Martens

This paper explores new data sources on multilateral trade in films among EU countries and with the USA in offline cinema and in online video-on-demand distribution. We observe variations in trade patterns across countries and films and explore how they affect cultural diversity.

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CULTURAL PROXIMITY MATTERS IN TIMES OF CRISIS

By Maria Masood Dechevrens and Céline Carrère

While the positive effect of sharing common cultural traits on bilateral trade flows has been abundantly confirmed in empirical trade analyses, the role of cultural proximity in times of crisis has been uncovered for the first time in an economic article recently published.

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MACHINE LEARNING TO UNCOVER DIFFERENCES IN WILLINGNESS-TO-PAY FOR THEATRE TICKETS

By Alina Ozhegova and Evgeniy M. Ozhegov

Estimation of willingness-to-pay (WTP) is widely spread approach in economics and marketing for problems of optimal pricing and measuring of product value for a customer. Machine learning approaches may help to estimate a range of WTP for theatre tickets and explain main sources of audience heterogeneity in estimates of WTP.

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CONSUMER AND EXPERT REVIEWS EFFECTS ON THE LENGTH OF TIME A FILM IS KEPT ON SCREENS

By Thaís Luiza Donega e Souza, Marislei Nishijima and Ana Cláudia Polato e Fava

We evaluate the effect of critical reviews by consumers and experts on a film’s running time at movie theaters in the United States. In addition to the usual expert critics’ reviews, we employ the consumer reviews rating and their affectivity about films as a measure for the consumer influence effect. We find evidence of consumer rating matter in keeping a film running longer at the theaters, but experts’ ratings have a larger influence on the movie market as a whole.

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