REPORT FROM BROOKLYN ON THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF ART DURING CORONAVIRUS TIME

By Cameron Weber

In Weber (2017), I introduce the category “art statism” to describe when the state, as defined by Max Weber (1919), uses public art to gain, maintain or grow its discretionary power. In this blog I share a personal story taking place during coronavirus-time in New York City, centered around the Brooklyn Museum and this highly-divisive time in American politics, to illustrate an on-the-ground example of art-statism.

Continue reading “REPORT FROM BROOKLYN ON THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF ART DURING CORONAVIRUS TIME”

TEACHING CULTURAL ECONOMICS

By Trine Bille, Anna Mignosa and Ruth Towse

Piero Zuccaro Interno incerto e oscillante, 2019, pastello a olio su tela, cm 40x30.jpeg

Is busking a source of income? What is the role of copyright for creators and performers? Can philanthropy and crowdfunding substitute the reduction of public support to the cultural sector? How have production and consumption of cultural products changed because of digitization? What are the contributions of big data and artificial intelligence? Has the notion of intangible heritage modified our way of looking at heritage? Will we just visit museums and watch movies at home? The cultural sector keeps on changing and ‘Teaching cultural economics’ intends to be a tool to tackle questions resulting from the evolution of the sector. Continue reading “TEACHING CULTURAL ECONOMICS”

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