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EconomistsTalkArt.org

Research-based policy analysis and commentary

FROM SNOBBY TO SUSTAINABLE: MOVING MUSEUM FUNDRAISING FROM SELECT ELITIST CONTRIBUTIONS TO DIVERSE COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION

By Yuha Jung

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With public funding for the arts decreasing, fundraising is becoming more vital—especially for museums where contributions comprise most of their revenue. However, traditional fundraising models, relying heavily on wealthy, white, well-educated donors, is less effective, excluding many perspectives and people. Museums need more inclusive fundraising to continue to thrive. Continue reading “FROM SNOBBY TO SUSTAINABLE: MOVING MUSEUM FUNDRAISING FROM SELECT ELITIST CONTRIBUTIONS TO DIVERSE COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION”

ARTISTS’ SURVIVAL RATE: EDUCATION MATTERS

By Trine Bille and Søren Jensen

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The literature of cultural economics generally finds that an artistic education has no significant impact on artists’ income and careers in the arts. In our research, we have readdressed this question by looking at the artists’ survival in the arts occupations. The results show that an artistic education has a significant impact on artists’ careers in the arts and we find important industry differences.

Continue reading “ARTISTS’ SURVIVAL RATE: EDUCATION MATTERS”

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION IN THE ARTS? NO TECHNIQUE CAN SUBSTITUTE A SUBSTANTIVE DISCUSSION OF THE MEANING OF ARTS, CULTURE AND HERITAGE FOR INDIVIDUALS, ORGANIZATIONS AND SOCIETY

By Francesco Chiaravalloti

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A systematic literature review of contributions to the arts and cultural sector which have appeared in accounting journals shows that the evaluation of the artistic performance of publicly funded arts organizations is not a purely procedural and technical issues relating to the production of better performance information, but it is above all a substantive and political one relating to the nature of the arts and the function of publicly funded arts organizations in individual communities and in society in general. Continue reading “PERFORMANCE EVALUATION IN THE ARTS? NO TECHNIQUE CAN SUBSTITUTE A SUBSTANTIVE DISCUSSION OF THE MEANING OF ARTS, CULTURE AND HERITAGE FOR INDIVIDUALS, ORGANIZATIONS AND SOCIETY”

EconomistsTalkArt.org SHARES ITS SUCCESS AND ENTHUSIASM INTO THE NEW YEAR

By Editorial Board

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ETA was launched in November 2015 to provide a space for the dissemination of research-based policy analysis and commentary by cultural economists. After a full year of activities, we are happy to have published 21 posts. The enthusiasm is shared by our many followers who visited the blog over 10,000 times. Continue reading “EconomistsTalkArt.org SHARES ITS SUCCESS AND ENTHUSIASM INTO THE NEW YEAR”

VOLATILITY OF PRICE INDICES FOR HETEROGENEOUS GOODS WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE FINE ART MARKET

By Fabian Bocart and Christian Hafner

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Understanding the behavior of art prices is important to precisely anticipate the financial benefits of owning art. So far, a very common approach in the scientific literature is to assume that all artworks follow a common, deterministic path. What happens if we reverse the perspective assuming that art prices behave randomly?

Continue reading “VOLATILITY OF PRICE INDICES FOR HETEROGENEOUS GOODS WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE FINE ART MARKET”

FAIRNESS CONSIDERATIONS IN THE LIVE MUSIC INDUSTRY

By Hendrik Sonnabend

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Traditional economic thinking presumes artists in the live music business to act like a monopolist who adjusts the ticket price to variations in demand whenever it is possible. This contribution provides strong evidence indicating that they do not. I argue that this behavior can best be explained with fairness expectations on the part of concert attendees. Continue reading “FAIRNESS CONSIDERATIONS IN THE LIVE MUSIC INDUSTRY”

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