WHAT EDITORS TALK ABOUT WHEN THEY TALK ABOUT EDITORS? AN ANALYSIS OF PUBLIC INTERVIEWS SEARCHING FOR MARKET AND AESTHETIC LOGICS

By Luca Pareschi and Maria Lusiani

The supposed conflict between aesthetic values and market logics has long been heating the debate among scholars in the cultural and creative industries: while over time researchers provided a more nuanced picture of the market-aesthetic logics tension, able to go beyond a prosaic conflict between the two extremes, some questions remain open. In this work we try to understand how editors in the publishing industry deal with market and aesthetic logics when they are interviewed regarding their work. Also, we address the organizational characteristics that may affect the editors’ discourses.

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REPORT FROM BROOKLYN ON THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF ART DURING CORONAVIRUS TIME

By Cameron Weber

In Weber (2017), I introduce the category “art statism” to describe when the state, as defined by Max Weber (1919), uses public art to gain, maintain or grow its discretionary power. In this blog I share a personal story taking place during coronavirus-time in New York City, centered around the Brooklyn Museum and this highly-divisive time in American politics, to illustrate an on-the-ground example of art-statism.

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TOOLS FOR THE FUTURE IN LJUBLJANA, RESEARCHING ART MARKETS AND GLOBAL SCIENTIFIC “ONLINE” TURMOIL

By Andrej Srakar

Beginning of September was time for the fifth workshop in the series Tools for the Future: Researching Art Market Practices from Past to Present. The workshop took place online in organization of the France Stele Institute of Art History of the Research Centre of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts (ZRC SAZU). Its topic was the role of legislation and legal regulators in the art market and included some of the best researchers on art markets at the intersection of art history, legal studies and cultural economics.

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DIGITAL PIRACY AND THE PERCEPTION OF PRICE FAIRNESS: EVIDENCE FROM A FIELD EXPERIMENT

By Anna Kukla‑Gryz, Joanna Tyrowicz, Michał Krawczyk

Digital piracy is an interesting case of an extremely common activity with a rather shady ethical and legal status. One way of understanding this paradox is in terms of numerous justifications for downloading files from unauthorized sources. Maybe the most commonly heard argument is that the original products are unfairly priced. Does unfair price really drive an easy-going approach to digital piracy?

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TESTING THE CULTURAL CAPITAL REPRODUCTION THEORY IN COLOMBIA

By Nora Elena Espinal-Monsalve, Andrey David Ramos-Ramírez y Luz Yadira Gómez-Hernández

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The relationship between cultural reproduction and cultural consumption can be framed from the theory of social reproduction of Bourdieu (1986) to the theories of cultural omnivorousness (Peterson, Simkus, and Kern, 1996) and individualization (Bauman (2007). Greater participation in cultural activities generates employment, economic growth, and increases the perception of the quality of life. As such, understanding the extent to which it is an inherited behaviour from parents, is a fundamental policy issue to reduce participation gaps among different demographics. Continue reading “TESTING THE CULTURAL CAPITAL REPRODUCTION THEORY IN COLOMBIA”

FROM CULTURAL HERITAGE TO DEVELOPMENT THROUGH CREATIVITY

By Silvia Cerisola

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The idea that cultural heritage may have a positive impact on economic development has been spreading for the last twenty years. However, its contribution is often just assumed or thought to occur exclusively through the touristic channel. A new perspective considers instead that cultural heritage can enhance regional performance also through some more sophisticated mechanisms, one of them being multidimensional creativity. Continue reading “FROM CULTURAL HERITAGE TO DEVELOPMENT THROUGH CREATIVITY”

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