Search

EconomistsTalkArt.org

Research-based policy analysis and commentary

THE PRINCESS OF ASTURIAS FOUNDATION OR HOW A NON-PROFIT INSTITUTION CAN BE EFFICIENT

By Víctor Fernández-Blanco and Ana Rodríguez-Álvarez

Competition and the internal logic of markets induce cultural firms and institutions to be efficient when market oriented. But, what happens in the case of non-profit organizations? They are beyond the market and their internal logic does not guarantee economic efficiency. In our article we explore the technical and allocative efficiency of The Princess of Asturias Foundation and confirm its good performance over the years.

Continue reading “THE PRINCESS OF ASTURIAS FOUNDATION OR HOW A NON-PROFIT INSTITUTION CAN BE EFFICIENT”

CULTURALLY-BIASED VOTING IN THE EUROVISION SONG CONTEST: DO NATIONAL CONTESTS DIFFER?

By Julia Pannicke and Oliver Budzinski

Regarding the Eurovision Song Contest (ESC) there are numerous controversies about discriminating and tactical voting. People vote for their neighbor countries and for countries with cultural similarities instead of evaluating simply the musical performance. If these biases were caused by the diversity of the different countries, voting biases should be less important for a national music contest with substantially more homogenous contestants. The question arises of whether biased voting occurs as well. Do national contests differ regarding their voting behavior? Is biased voting maybe unavoidable?

Continue reading “CULTURALLY-BIASED VOTING IN THE EUROVISION SONG CONTEST: DO NATIONAL CONTESTS DIFFER?”

FILM AND THE CITY: SYMBIOTIC ASSOCIATION BETWEEN RIO DE JANEIRO AND BRAZIL’S MOVIE INDUSTRY

By João Luiz de Figueiredo and Rodrigo Carvalho

Brasil_Animado

Creative activities tend to materialize within the landscape of large cities as agglomerations of specialized firms and skilled labour, which offer extremely innovative resources. Major cities have been the site of the vast expansion of commercial cultural production that has occurred in recent decades. They are the locus of a range of creative industries such as fashion, music, architecture, advertising, graphic arts, and film. Cultural industries are able to contribute to the evolution of cities while playing a crucial role in the social reproduction of economic systems that are essential elements in the formation of competitive advantages in a given territory. In Brazil, Rio de Janeiro created and benefited from the Brazilian’s film industry. Continue reading “FILM AND THE CITY: SYMBIOTIC ASSOCIATION BETWEEN RIO DE JANEIRO AND BRAZIL’S MOVIE INDUSTRY”

WOMEN BENEFIT MORE: CONNECTIONS BETWEEN SLOVENIAN VISUAL ARTISTS OF THE 19 AND 20 CENTURIES

By Andrej Srakar, Petja Grafenauer and Marilena Vecco

Portraits.png

Slovenian art history has received very little (if any) attention from the viewpoint of network theory. Are the artists more productive when forming and working in groups? Is there any special influence of gender, age, occupation, or income? Are there any benefits to connect with artists from as diverse fields as possible? We find highly productive women artists make more intense use of their networks and provide some reflections. Continue reading “WOMEN BENEFIT MORE: CONNECTIONS BETWEEN SLOVENIAN VISUAL ARTISTS OF THE 19 AND 20 CENTURIES”

FROM SNOBBY TO SUSTAINABLE: MOVING MUSEUM FUNDRAISING FROM SELECT ELITIST CONTRIBUTIONS TO DIVERSE COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION

By Yuha Jung

diversity-fundraising

With public funding for the arts decreasing, fundraising is becoming more vital—especially for museums where contributions comprise most of their revenue. However, traditional fundraising models, relying heavily on wealthy, white, well-educated donors, is less effective, excluding many perspectives and people. Museums need more inclusive fundraising to continue to thrive. Continue reading “FROM SNOBBY TO SUSTAINABLE: MOVING MUSEUM FUNDRAISING FROM SELECT ELITIST CONTRIBUTIONS TO DIVERSE COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION”

ARTISTS’ SURVIVAL RATE: EDUCATION MATTERS

By Trine Bille and Søren Jensen

sweerts_michael_-_the_drawing_class_-_1656-58

The literature of cultural economics generally finds that an artistic education has no significant impact on artists’ income and careers in the arts. In our research, we have readdressed this question by looking at the artists’ survival in the arts occupations. The results show that an artistic education has a significant impact on artists’ careers in the arts and we find important industry differences.

Continue reading “ARTISTS’ SURVIVAL RATE: EDUCATION MATTERS”

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: