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EconomistsTalkArt.org

Research-based policy analysis and commentary

ARE THEY ALL THE SAME? A CASE STUDY OF THREE AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS ARTISTS

By Lisa Farrell, Jane M. Fry and Tim R.L. Fry

Many studies of art auctions assume that a single statistical model using observed characteristics relating to the artwork and the auction can explain the observed variation in the sample of all artworks and artists. We show that such “pooling” is not always appropriate and may lead to erroneous conclusions.

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EconomistsTalkArt.org wishes you happy holidays and a great new year 2018!

By The Editorial Team

The Editorial Team of EconomistsTalkArt.org wishes you a happy start into the New Year! The blog, which started as an initiative of the nights of EWACE in Vienna 2015, has become one of the central dissemination tools of the work of cultural economists around the world. In the two years of our existence we have been visited by more than 25,000 times by 15,000 visitors from almost all countries of the world.

We sincerely hope the New Year will continue providing you with the pleasure of reading posts written by leading authors in cultural economics!

With best wishes,

Andrej, Cedric, Karol, Marilena and Trilce

MUSEUMS SELLING ART: LA LIAISON DANGEREUSE BETWEEN DEACCESSIONS AND DONATIONS

By Luigi Di Gaetano and Isidoro Mazza

Economic downturns and policy reversals have caused a shortage of public and private funding for many museums. Museums in dire straits have therefore considered deaccessioning part of their collection. The question whether deaccessions could be a viable, although exceptional, option continues to ignite a lively debate and a fierce opposition by museum associations around the world fearing that deaccessioning would send a bad signal to donors. The study investigates this hypothesis using a game theory approach.

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THE ENTREPRENEURIAL ARTIST: THE SAME, OR DIFFERENT, THAN OTHER NON-ARTIST ENTREPRENEURS?

By Joanna Woronkowicz and Douglas Noonan

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Why do workers earning wages or salaries decide to become self-employed, and are artists like other professionals in this regard?  Artists “go freelance” more than other professionals, especially during the Great Recession.  Freelancing artists resemble other professional “independent contractors,” but differ involving education, urban locations, and families.

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AWFULLY BEAUTIFUL? I REALLY LIKE THIS ARTWORK, IF I AM NOT MISTAKEN

By Monika Kackovic 

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Information about the quality of producers and products has strategic value and affects economic decisions. But what happens in markets with informational gaps where quality is difficult to observe and where objective criteria to make quality judgments are largely lacking?

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TRANSFORMATION AND JOB CREATION IN THE CULTURAL AND CREATIVE INDUSTRIES IN SOUTH AFRICA

By Jen Snowball, Alan Collins and Delon Tarentaal

The Cultural and Creative Industries (CCIs) have been hailed as offering great potential to create jobs and to be socially inclusive. This study investigates to what extent the CCIs in South Africa are moving towards more inclusive and racially diverse patterns in their ownership and employment profiles. Using a survey of 2400 randomly selected CCIs, it compares ownership and employment patterns across the six UNESCO Cultural Domains to determine their contribution to black economic empowerment (transformation) within the various domains.

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