CULTURAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP: UNDERSTANDING THE MARKET FOR MEANING

By Yu-Yu Chang, Jason Potts, and Hui-Yu Shih

Cultural commodities, whether goods or services, are vehicles for conveying cultural and creative content. Consumers perceive value in these goods or services when they successfully deliver symbolic meaning rather than simply accomplishing utilitarian or functional purposes. Therefore, cultural entrepreneurs are not necessarily artists, but those who discover opportunities by observing and creating connections between the subjective meanings of the cultural production and the meanings mutually developed across consumer networks, groups and markets.

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DO MUSEUMS FOSTER INNOVATION THROUGH ENGAGEMENT WITH THE CULTURAL AND CREATIVE INDUSTRIES?

By Chiara Dalle Nogare and Monika Murzyn-Kupisz

The recent narrative on museums as catalysts of innovation considers their relations with other cultural and creative industries to be very important. To verify this claim, we propose a conceptual framework qualifying these relations as either strong, moderate, or weak links, according to their potential in terms of knowledge spillovers from museums to the CCIs. We apply this classification to data collected from Polish museums. Our findings indicate that strong links are outnumbered by moderate and weak ones.

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“IN THE MOOD FOR TECHNOLOGY?”: DIGITAL AND CINEMA

By Pierre-Jean Benghozi

Digital companies have invested the film industry by imposing their economic models. Meanwhile, a less disruptive “Art and Science” model of innovation has also emerged, with balanced relations with the players in place. These new technical intermediaries in the cinema are empowering themselves around skills and innovation platforms affecting all segments of the industry.

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THE CHANGING SOCIAL ECONOMY OF ART, ARE THE ARTS BECOMING LESS EXCLUSIVE?

By Hans Abbing

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Respect for art is high, also among those who do not consume serious art, though subsidy cuts testify of a decreasing respect for the “serious arts”. In spite of cuts, the so-called “excellent art”, like the very costly performances of certain high-end opera companies, continues to receive much public support —support of which almost exclusively well-to-do people profit. The performances are sometimes innovative, but not more than most of the less costly performances.

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