TEACHING CULTURAL ECONOMICS

By Trine Bille, Anna Mignosa and Ruth Towse

Piero Zuccaro Interno incerto e oscillante, 2019, pastello a olio su tela, cm 40x30.jpeg

Is busking a source of income? What is the role of copyright for creators and performers? Can philanthropy and crowdfunding substitute the reduction of public support to the cultural sector? How have production and consumption of cultural products changed because of digitization? What are the contributions of big data and artificial intelligence? Has the notion of intangible heritage modified our way of looking at heritage? Will we just visit museums and watch movies at home? The cultural sector keeps on changing and ‘Teaching cultural economics’ intends to be a tool to tackle questions resulting from the evolution of the sector. Continue reading “TEACHING CULTURAL ECONOMICS”

DO THEATERS MAXIMIZE ATTENDANCE OR REVENUE?

By Andrea Baldin and Trine Bille

Most performing arts organizations are characterized by a complex array of objectives than merely the maximization of revenue.  In this paper, we introduce a multi-objective optimization model that jointly considers pricing and seat allocation. The proposed model is validated with booking data referring to the Royal Danish theater during the period 2010–2015.
Continue reading “DO THEATERS MAXIMIZE ATTENDANCE OR REVENUE?”

ARTISTS’ SURVIVAL RATE: EDUCATION MATTERS

By Trine Bille and Søren Jensen

sweerts_michael_-_the_drawing_class_-_1656-58

The literature of cultural economics generally finds that an artistic education has no significant impact on artists’ income and careers in the arts. In our research, we have readdressed this question by looking at the artists’ survival in the arts occupations. The results show that an artistic education has a significant impact on artists’ careers in the arts and we find important industry differences.

Continue reading “ARTISTS’ SURVIVAL RATE: EDUCATION MATTERS”

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